Why Coronavirus is an Opportunity

A week ago I was feeling fairly blasé about coronavirus. We were laughing at the stupidity of people panic buying toilet paper and hand sanitiser. Since then, I’ve been realising the scale and seriousness of this pandemic. I’ve been devouring information from the World Health Organisation, discovering why we should approach the pandemic with a systems-thinking lens and curiously analysing interactive maps showing confirmed cases throughout the world. … More Why Coronavirus is an Opportunity

Climate Strikes: Their Impact

Last week, in the world of climate activism, an estimated 6 million people globally took to the streets (including a whopping 3.5% of New Zealand’s population marching); Greta Thurberg delivered her emotionally charged ‘How Dare You?’ speech to world leaders at the UN Climate Summit in New York; and 16 teenage activists filed a law suit against Argentina, Brazil, France, Germany and Turkey for contravening the UN Convention on the Rights of the Child by not sufficiently reducing their carbon emissions. … More Climate Strikes: Their Impact

Being The Other: A White Kiwi’s Experience

As a Farang in Thailand, I definitely felt like
‘the other’. Being blonde and fair skinned, people often stared at me in the
street; they talked about me on the bus (“…… Farang…… …… Farang…..”);
they rudely pushed in front of me at checkout lines at 7-Eleven; I often had to pay higher prices than locals or was sometimes not served at food outlets (I attributed this predominantly to shyness or embarrassment at not being able speak English – even though I could speak enough Thai to order food). … More Being The Other: A White Kiwi’s Experience

Children Who Work

Globally, there are around 168 million children (or 11% of all children) who work, with over half of these engaged in work which is harmful to their health and well-being. Many (68%) of these children are working unpaid, assisting family with care-giving, household tasks or helping in family businesses. … More Children Who Work

Volunteering: Ethical Considerations

Before I left for a three-month volunteer teacher position working with Burmese migrants in Ranong, Thailand (which subsequently turned into 15 months) I pondered some of the issues raised in my last blog: We Need to Talk About Voluntourism: A Commentary Was I doing the right thing? Was I really needed there? What would the impact of having someone from another culture and no knowledge of the local language be? Were my experience and qualifications adequate to do the job I was tasked with? Rather than become part of the problem, I wanted to empower, build capability and inspire. … More Volunteering: Ethical Considerations